ORGANIZED CRIME IN AMERICA by Gus Tyler

ORGANIZED CRIME IN AMERICA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Two volumes of ""readings"" by Mr. Tyler all of which deal with what he claims to be a new class in America risen to power and prestige within the last 25 years, the American underworld: ""A well organized cartel, with international ties"". Despite hearings, crack-downs, and the sweat of some law enforcement agents, the syndicate perseveres, indeed thrives, netting a cool, tax-exempt 23 billion dollars a year. They encroach upon legitimate businesses, the so called ""service industries"" mostly, as well as its own little industries: gambling, prostitution, extortion, white-slavery, waterfront racketeering, and loan-sharking. Tyler objects to the way in which we have attempted to solve the crime problem in the last decades: ""We can no longer confine ourselves to the weakness in the accepted social institution that permitted the infestation; we must now examine the underworld itself as a distinct, independent force and power, as something sui generis."" Besides stimulation of public interest, new legislation, and further intervention by the federal government, Mr. Tyler suggests that the solution lies in putting more emphasis on public interest and less on the individual's liberties and freedom. He countenances wire-tapping and gets downright self- righteous about the extra-legal use of same by law enforcement agents, although one would think that respect for the law should begin with ""the law"". A rather melodramatic, carelessly organized attempt that cries to be read aloud by Walter Winchell.

Publisher: University of Michigan