IN PEACE JAPAN BREEDS WAR by Gustav Eckstein

IN PEACE JAPAN BREEDS WAR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is not a contemporary war picture of Japan, for it is a sensitive, recapitulation of a trip made in 1924, at the time of the Japanese Exclusion Act. This is an enlightened, often subtle study of the Japanese, written with precision and finesse. Random impressions -- incidents -- legend here, history there, contacts with individuals, all point up a quality of that paradoxical people. ""A humor and a coarseness and a cruelty unimagined by Lafcadio Hearn"", a rigidity of method, or order, an indirection of approach, and above all a medievalism which places them very far in the past -- these are the Japanese. Assassination and narakari, language and religion, the Emperor as a ""sacred person"" but not the seat of power, Japanese family life and the double standard of the wife and geisha girl, schooling, personalities like Toyama, who founded the Black Dragon Society, and Yamagata who built the Japanese Army, small part of many of the facets of Japan touched upon. Perceptive -- provocative.

Pub Date: March 17th, 1943
Publisher: Harper