THE VESEY INHERITANCE by Gwen Butler

THE VESEY INHERITANCE

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

With Sarsen Place, Miss Butler moved away from her traditional continuity of Coffin-ed crimes toward the Victorian, toward the Gothic, while scarpering in and out of the high and lowlife of this era. Now Errol Vesey, from a sheltered parsonage, comes up to London to stay with her elegant Aunt Geraldine, to try to find out the real troth about herself and her ""inheritance""--perhaps one and the same, to identify the man who was her mother's byblow via an Austrian archduke, and to participate sympathetically in the work of her good friend--a militant free woman fighting the abuses of her sex. This gives some documentary significance to what might have been just another fribbling period entertainment but it is by no means as good a story as Sarsen Place, however well appointed, with just enough stiffening so that you can think of it as bombazine and cambric rather than silk and satin.

Pub Date: Oct. 20th, 1975
Publisher: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan