THE PRINCESS AND THE PAUPER by Gwen Davis

THE PRINCESS AND THE PAUPER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

With a nod to Mark Twain, the author of trashy tun (Silk Lady; Ladies in Waiting; The Aristocrats) displays a surprisingly light touch for gentle satire: an unhappy princess changes places with a Welsh miner's cheerful wife. Princess Darcy is the envy of women throughout the world, but her fairy-tale marriage to Prince Rodney of Perq (a tropical island tax-haven in the Irish Sea) is not a happy one. And something is rotten in Perq: Rachid, the Libyan arms-merchant usurper who won the realm in a crap game. During a royal visit to Wales, the princess meets miner's wife (not a true pauper) Shun, who has learned upper-class etiquette from a fake duchess. The two women realize they are look-alikes, and change roles. Princess Darcy struggles with cooking and housework, but her character is much improved due to magical intervention; Shun proves to be an excellent match for Prince Rodney, while her first love--an egocentric actor--returns to Wales and tries to take Darcy from honest, hard-working miner Tom. Further complications ensue as Rachid has an impostor princess created via plastic surgery--she is to discredit Darcy by posing for Playboy. Along the way, there's ample sex in this "erotic fairy tale," but it's sometimes comic, mostly more romantic and less graphic, than the usual Davis outing. A quietly amusing contemporary fable that makes fun of women's dreams (especially Someday My Prince Will Come), but still provides a happy ending with comeuppance for the villain and love for everyone else.

Pub Date: May 10th, 1989
ISBN: 316-17499-8
Publisher: Little, Brown
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