THE HOLY TERROR by H. G. Wells

THE HOLY TERROR

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KIRKUS REVIEW

H.G.W. has been preaching his gospel of all knowledge made available for all the world as a path to international settlements, and he gets that steed into his stable in a story of the making of a dictator and the creation of a world state. He sets his clock forward only a few years, but those years have made the world ripe for the domination of the Common Man. Trouble is, he creates as his symbol, a man who is barely emerging from unpleasant adolescence, and who, drunk with ambition and power, takes on too much of the character of today's dictators. Once in the saddle, rationalization goes haywire, in the pursuit of an ideal of the collective will -- which, ultimately, he is unwilling to yield to. All the main speakers in the story are Mr. Wells, in his varied characters, and as a novel the book limps badly, once our horrid small boy, grows beyond horrid adolescence to still more horrid maturity.

Pub Date: April 10th, 1939
Publisher: Simon & Schuster