Welch’s engaging style and touches of humor make this an easy read, and the facts he presents make a convincing case.

LESS MEDICINE, MORE HEALTH

7 ASSUMPTIONS THAT DRIVE TOO MUCH MEDICAL CARE

A bright, lively discussion of the excesses of medical care to which patients often unwittingly go due to certain false assumptions.

In a natural follow-up to his previous book, Welch (co-author: Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health, 2011, etc.), a primary care physician who teaches at Dartmouth Medical School, warns that too much medical care can be bad for your health. Patients and doctors are driven toward action by various forces—e.g., patients feel they are being paid attention to, which makes them feel better, and doctors like getting credit for trying if not for curing. The author lays out his argument around seven faulty assumptions too often made by the public: 1) All risks can be lowered; 2) It’s always better to fix the problem; 3) Sooner is always better; 4) It never hurts to get more information; 5) Action is always better than inaction; 6) Newer is always better; 7) It’s all about avoiding death. Drawing on history, scientific research, statistics and his own experience, Welch demonstrates the flaws in these assumptions. His stories involve the risks, uncertainties and harms of cancer screenings, treatments for heart disease, drugs, medical devices and surgical procedures. He makes an especially strong case for the risks of mass screenings for cancer—the fear, the false alarms, the overdiagnoses and the resulting overtreatments. Vivid images make what could be discouragingly technical quite understandable: Small, nonlethal tumors that need no treatment are “turtles,” aggressive ones that have already spread and are beyond cure are “birds,” and the ones that might be stopped by early treatment are “rabbits.” In Welch’s view, cancer screening can find “rabbits” but it creates the problem of overdiagnosis of “turtles” and offers little benefit to “birds.”

Welch’s engaging style and touches of humor make this an easy read, and the facts he presents make a convincing case.

Pub Date: March 3, 2015

ISBN: 978-0-8070-7164-9

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Beacon Press

Review Posted Online: Nov. 29, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2014

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. AND THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON

This early reader is an excellent introduction to the March on Washington in 1963 and the important role in the march played by Martin Luther King Jr. Ruffin gives the book a good, dramatic start: “August 28, 1963. It is a hot summer day in Washington, D.C. More than 250,00 people are pouring into the city.” They have come to protest the treatment of African-Americans here in the US. With stirring original artwork mixed with photographs of the events (and the segregationist policies in the South, such as separate drinking fountains and entrances to public buildings), Ruffin writes of how an end to slavery didn’t mark true equality and that these rights had to be fought for—through marches and sit-ins and words, particularly those of Dr. King, and particularly on that fateful day in Washington. Within a year the Civil Rights Act of 1964 had been passed: “It does not change everything. But it is a beginning.” Lots of visual cues will help new readers through the fairly simple text, but it is the power of the story that will keep them turning the pages. (Easy reader. 6-8)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 2001

ISBN: 0-448-42421-5

Page Count: 48

Publisher: Grosset & Dunlap

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2000

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