WINDS OF MORNING by H. L. Davis

WINDS OF MORNING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Told by Amos G. Clarke in the first person, this concerns itself with the killing of Piute Charlie by Busick, a foreman who concentrates on illegal projects and Clarke's inability to make the charge stick. He then joins up with old Pop Hendricks, now herding horses, but still accomplished in old time prowess, whose conscience drives him to befriend a daughter whose husband has been murdered, and various of his descendants. Clarke and Hendricks drive the horses, try to keep a young Mexican out of the hands of the law, protect Busick's young daughter and untangle the intricate web that holds everyone in its confines. Along the route there is local history, anecdotes and clutter of old gossip about the ranchers and settlers and it is Hendricks' philosophy that man cannot ""escape from anything by skirting around it"" that finally writes a finis to his pilgrimage. Strong on the sheep ranching country and the lore of outdoors, this has its moments of desty humor, hard won integrity and human interest stories but does not measure up to his earlier Honey in the Horn and Beulah Land.

Publisher: Morrow