THE WIND IS RISING by H. M. Tomnson
Kirkus Star

THE WIND IS RISING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Tomnson has written a beautiful book, a reader's book primarily, perhaps, for the sureness of literary artistry has been brought to bear on one man's view expressed through a chronology of two years, from August '39 to August '41. With Mr. Tomnson one reexperiences events, emotions, and their effects on London, on the country of England. He reassesses the years' damage, the loss of landmarks; the gains in faith, the valor of the common man, the new meaning of America. He writes of the entry of Russia into the war. He sees in censorship the real blackout. He vaunts his pride in the people of his country. This is -- one might say -- a philosophical series of essays, flawlessly done, largely intellectual and spiritual in quality, analytical from the literary and historical points of view. Should win wide recognition from the critical press, and his name may carry it over the hurdle of its limitations.

Pub Date: March 11th, 1942
Publisher: Little, Brown