FROM APE TO ANGEL by H. R. Hays

FROM APE TO ANGEL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Social anthropology, in any organized, functional way, began in the 19th century, received its driving intellectual impetus from Darwinism, nourished itself at many psychological founts, principally Freudian, emerged scientifically mature from the Boss era, and, today, revels in such refinements as the study of Middletown or the effects of a labor strike. The emphasis here is decidedly upon individuals and their contributions to anthropological method, concept, attitude. But there is all the abundance of episode and color that anyone aimlessly curious could ask. The author may have slighted the current Jungian anthropologists in England and the overall role of Jung; he may have included too much of the purely ""human interest"" and not enough of the purely theoretic aspects of the field; he may have avoided too arbitrarily the influences upon social anthropology of other researches in the field. But the defects are a matter of opinion or preference; the qualities of readability and informativeness are not.

Pub Date: April 21st, 1958
Publisher: Knopf