ANDREW TO THE LIONS by H. W. Freeman

ANDREW TO THE LIONS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Suffolk was the soil from which he sprang, and it was to Suffolk that Andrew returned after eight years in Italy. But he has become too much the Latin for his village neighbors. He had found in Florence that the exuberance of the Italians was to his taste, and in his relations with his landlady he became a new man. He could not go back to teaching in an English school. The distress of his mistress' daughter in Spain uproots him again, and this time he goes to Spain, to her rescue, vainly as it happens, for the Spanish war forced escape across the border, where the jealous husband caught up with them. It is an odd theme -- this contrast in ways of thought and life, and Freeman has made his backgrounds more convincing than his characters. One feels that Andrew is merely the test tube for his thesis. He can write, but this lacks the substance and the power of his earliest work, Joseph and His, Brethren.

Pub Date: Oct. 26th, 1938
Publisher: Morrow