THERE'S NOTHING NEW IN SPORTS: The Story of How Sports Began by Hal Butler

THERE'S NOTHING NEW IN SPORTS: The Story of How Sports Began

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The first cousins of bowling are curling, shuffleboard, croquet and billiards, and our favorite sports of baseball and football had British parents in cricket and rugby: none of this is overlooked in Mr. Butler's exploration of the origins and early development of several competitive sports. Although bowling, football, baseball, basketball, golf, hockey, auto-racing, and track and field get the star billings they deserve, the author touches upon curiosities such as jousting and squash as well. Mr. Butler's concern with important personalities and the attitude of the public toward each sport adds interest to the book in which, conscientiously balancing amusing anecdote and some very unenlightening colloquial dialogue with the chronological data, he produces a smooth and generally interesting text. It supplements standard histories of sports.

Pub Date: March 20th, 1967
Publisher: Messner