WHEN FISH GOT FEET, SHARKS GOT TEETH, AND BUGS BEGAN TO SWARM by Hannah Bonner

WHEN FISH GOT FEET, SHARKS GOT TEETH, AND BUGS BEGAN TO SWARM

A Cartoon Prehistory of Life Long Before Dinosaurs
From the "When…" series, volume 2
by , illustrated by
Age Range: 8 - 12

KIRKUS REVIEW

The author of When Bugs Were Big, Plants Were Strange, and Tetrapods Stalked the Earth (2003) continues her droll but dependable tour of deep prehistory, focusing here on the flora, fauna and fungi of the Silurian and Devonian Periods, approximately 360 to 44 million years ago. This was the time when larger forms of life began to emerge on land, while, among the far richer variety of marine animals, fish wriggled to the top, thanks to newly developed jaws which allowed them “to say good-bye to a monotonous diet of teensy stuff. Now fish could grab, slice and dice to their heart’s content.” By the end, soil, forests and, of course, feet had also appeared. Fearlessly folding in tongue-challenging names and mixing simply drawn reconstructions and maps with goofy flights of fancy—on the first spread Robin Mite and Friar Millipede are caught on a stroll through Sherwood Moss Patch, and on the last, genial nautiloid Amphicyrtoceras plugs the previous volume—Bonner serves up a second heaping course of science that will both stick to the ribs and tickle them. (index, resource lists, time line) (Nonfiction. 8-12)

Pub Date: Oct. 9th, 2007
ISBN: 978-1-4263-0078-3
Page count: 48pp
Publisher: National Geographic
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15th, 2007