THE BLACK EARTH by Hans Habe
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THE BLACK EARTH

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A gripping novel built around the march of so-called progress, in Habe's native Hungary, from feudal rule by the great landowners, to the betrayal of the idealists who believed that the Communists were allowing Hungarians to free their own land. It is a passionate story of a groping towards freedom, told in the person of a young peasant, Bela Sulyck, who battled in his soul against the slavery to which he was heir- who swore vengeance against the beautiful young countess who took him, briefly, as a lover, and who escaped to join the Communist underground when the Germans were grinding Hungary under the iron heel. His rapid rise in the army, from being taken captive by the Russians- his installation as Minister of Agriculture in the new government, made him secure in his belief that his goal of freedom and plenty was within his grasp. Then comes disillusion, but not before he has found a new faith, a new leadership, and a new love. An absorbing story which reveals one small segment of the struggle behind the Iron Curtain. Habe's best known book was A Thousand Shall Fall. This has much of its sweep and power.

Pub Date: Oct. 17th, 1952
Publisher: Putnam