PATTERNS OF WOLFPEN by Harian Hatcher
Kirkus Star

PATTERNS OF WOLFPEN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Four generations of the Patterns built traditions which had their fruition in Sparrel Pattern and his family, still living off the land their forebears accepted as ""a place for a man to live in"". Kentucky mountain land, several thousand acres of farm land and lumber, overlooking Big Sandy and Cannon Creek -- an independent existence, self-sustaining, a daily round of labor which contributed to a gracious, simple, cultivated, homely life. Then came the impact of ""civilization"" in the shape of a representative of lumbering interests -- and, in order to give his children the chance in this new world that was pressing against their doors, Sparrel agreed to sell enough of his woodland to set up a lumber mill. Ugliness, disease, death come to Wolfpen. The family falls asunder. But love comes too. A leisurely book, carved out of the sinews of our country, compact of human emotions and nature at her finest. A book for the long haul.

Pub Date: Oct. 10th, 1934
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill