60 SECONDS TO MIND EXPANSION by Harold & Joel Davitz Cook

60 SECONDS TO MIND EXPANSION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Meditation? Biofeedback? Sensitivity training? Cook and Davitz' course of progressively graded ""mind-expanding"" exercises is either all or none of the above; in any case it avoids the holder claims of the genre and concentrates on modest, well-thought-out purposes. The exercises, which proceed from simple techniques like concentrating on the tactile qualities of a coin or small object in the hand to complicated feats such as free-association sequences of imagery, are at worst harmless and soothing, at best intellectually and emotionally refreshing. The authors (who teach psychology at Columbia University Teacher's College) do a little burbling about liberating everyone's secret untapped reservoirs of creativity, but it's kept within tolerable limits, and the exercises are genuinely well-designed.

Pub Date: Aug. 12th, 1975
Publisher: Random House