THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A CURMUDGEON by Harold L. Ickes

THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A CURMUDGEON

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This book starts with too many counts against it to be assured of the market it should have. The die-hard Republicans, the press, the anti New Dealers, Big Business, -- all will pass it up (or pretend to). For he has no sacred cows. He fought dirty politics without benefit of a consistent party line, -- 17 years in Chicago, and almost as many on the national battlefront; he never loses a chance to call a spade a shovel, when it is a matter of the Hearst-McCormick-Patterson press, and he gets in a few sly digs at the others, most of which have had their turn at him. This is not a conventional personal story; there is very little of his personal life, for the stress is almost wholly on the steps up the ladder of his chosen field of politics. The final chapters which almost alone are personal, (except for his school days and early newspaper days), seem out of key. Here's a book with plenty of dynamite, which shows up the shady side of politics through a long life; which justifies a reputation for honesty, integrity, straight shooting -- and fearless bluntness. Much of it is good reading; some of it ancient history.

Pub Date: April 13th, 1943
Publisher: Reynal & Hitchcock