GARDEN TO THE EASTWARD by Harold Lamb

GARDEN TO THE EASTWARD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This has the makings of a novel blend of Lost Horizon and a bit of Buchan. But somehow, midway, it begs down in the burden of scholarship which has been an integral part of Lamb's historical novels, -- or perhaps in the philosophizing on the ecstasy of escape to a remote island of peace in a troubled world. Here is a novel which defies the adventure of escape. The time is 1946- a young American Intelligence officer, on terminal leave, is lured from Cairo to the East,-Baghdad, then on, seeking the source of a rare bit of prehistoric metal, and the mystery of the lost mountain of Araman. He is helped on his way by a native Kurd, an archeologist; by an invalid scholar, an Englishman, at whose retreat he meets the lovely, eerie Michal Thorne, late of Athens. Jacob goes on until he finds/his mountain -- a tiny survival of a lost race- the place the original Garden of Eden. There too he finds love- as Michal follows him. He finds also the almost legendary German, in hiding- and the reaching tentacles of the Soviet and war. The story ends with the dim hope that Washington will find a way to save this ""garden to the eastward"". The story is rich with beauty- with detail- with symbolism.

Pub Date: March 6th, 1947
Publisher: Doubleday