THE SEMI-ARTIFICIAL MAN by Harold Schmeck

THE SEMI-ARTIFICIAL MAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Though this is a fairly detailed report of modern attempts to replace failing organs in the human body, the transplant here from news coverage (Schmeck is a New York Times reporter) to book form is less skillful. The ten essays cover kidney replacements, the marvelous functions of the artificial kidney and heart-lung machines, successful and unsuccessful experiments to replace injured or diseased organs or limbs, and the ethical questions which face scientists and laymen who must choose individuals from among many to receive treatment-- treatment severely handicapped by lack of machines and trained personnel. On the whole the handling is surprisingly repetitive, and the writer should have better focused and integrated his material. Stronger editorial guidance seems indicated.

Pub Date: March 10th, 1965
Publisher: Walker