EDWARD ROSE, NEGRO TRAIL BLAZER by Harold W. Felton

EDWARD ROSE, NEGRO TRAIL BLAZER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

No tall tales here--hardly any tale at all. With several references to the incompleteness of existing records, Mr. Felton presents a tribute to the ""trail blazers' trail blazer"" by compiling and quoting from other accounts, some contemporary with Rose. We learn about expeditions in which he took part (""and Ed Rose served well as interpreter...a good chance it was Ed Rose"") but only enough about the man to accept, provisionally, the author's oft-repeated insistence on his uniqueness. Only two episodes provide such insight (or have sustained narrative interest): the long journey with Charbonneau, the Lewis and Clark interpreter, as escort to six squaws, on which Rose traded away his sun for a bow-and-arrow, gave away the bow-and-arrow and his knife and--when Charbonneau was almost mad with anxiety--killed a buffalo with a handmade spear; the near-mutiny of six hundred furious Crows which Rose quelled by swinging the barrel of a gun and facing down the Crow chief. It's not a biography, really, but an attempt to establish the integrity, ability and bravery of a man who was suspected in his lifetime and denigrated later. As rebuttal, it has a place; as mountaineering documented, it is one of many.

Pub Date: Aug. 14th, 1967
Publisher: Dodd, Mead