A POET'S LIFE by Harriet Monroe

A POET'S LIFE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This book was the expression of Miss Monroe's old age, and proves again the claim that autobiography should ordinarily be written when the young author is alert to life, ""sizzling to the touch"". This book lacks passion and feeling. It is merely an honest and sincere record of a career as a poet rather than a career as a woman. Seldom does she give any intimate glimpses of her life, dismissing her love affair in a single paragraph. People who have had close contact with Miss Monroe's circle, who have recognized and profited by her contribution to American poetry, will want to read this book. Some of the correspondence included is with notable figures. A third of the book is devoted to the inception and career of the magazine Poetry. Contemporary poets figure largely in these pages, with their arguments pro and con new developments. Not a warm and mellow book (such as Roman Spring), but it does fill a place in the record of American letters.

Pub Date: March 29th, 1938
Publisher: Macmillan