TALES OF THUNDER AND LIGHTNING by Harry Devlin

TALES OF THUNDER AND LIGHTNING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

To the Mayans, lightning was made by a giant in heaven lighting his cigar. . . Hungarian children attribute thunder to the Clanking of St. Peter's keys as he rushes about scolding the angels. . . Czechs say it's the drumbeats of devils celebrating a wedding. . . and the Irish combine both heaven and hell in their tale of angels chasing devils across the sky. Devlin passes on a number of folk beliefs which he collected firsthand from friends around the world, and illustrates them with color-saturated pictures that vary both in style (to suit the stories origin) and effectiveness (he's best with devils, corniest with angels). Only a few, such as the Nigerian tale of the messenger who stole the Orisha's lightning, have anything approaching a plot, and we can't imagine how hearing them could effect the intended ""permanent cure"" of brontophobia, but all together they could provide the prescribed diversion while Thor's hammer pounds and Vulcan's fiery arrows fly.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1975
Publisher: Parents' Magazine Press