ELLIOTT O'DONNELL'S CASEBOOK OF GHOSTS by Harry-Ed. Ludlam

ELLIOTT O'DONNELL'S CASEBOOK OF GHOSTS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Mr. O'Donnell who gave up the ghost a few years ago but has been around in some form or another (a good many collections) reappears along with an introduction by that grand old man of Sauk City, August Derleth. O'Donnell, a prosy writer, who returns to an earlier recorded past as well as endless present day witnesses, wrote up some thirty experiences here--of cats and bats, banshees and bogles, werewolves and the dachsund in a yellow collar. He is most fascinated with the knockings, moans and shrieks which occurred in a parsonage in 1833; much more terrifying--the decomposed floating head in midair or the woman pursued by a hunchback. The most curious incidental he contributes is that many hauntings are attended by plagues of beetles. . . . It's hard to say when these were written--many in the early 1900's it would seem--certainly he represents an earlier Zeitgeist and assumes olderfangled readers.

Pub Date: Dec. 3rd, 1969
Publisher: Taplinger