SIR AND BROTHER by Harry Lee

SIR AND BROTHER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Inside and outside working of a labor union in full operation supplies a measure of interest as does also the character of the labor leader, but the story of his love affair with a married woman is frank stuff, patently dragged in for sales purposes and contributing in no way either to the depth of the story or the movement of the drama. The dedicated leader, the opposition, the Washington scenes, the trouble within the union as the plot moves forward, all of the paraphernalia are there. While the love affair smooches along, the affairs within the union march briskly and have a certain vitality and interest. The book, however, lacks a single point of tension, has little or no style to save it, and the characters leave the reader indifferent. Labor enthusiasts may read the book for their interest in the competent handling of that phase of the text, but it is doubtful whether the general public will pay the price of admission.

Pub Date: Sept. 30th, 1948
Publisher: Appleton-Century-Crofts