PUBLIC LIBRARIES FOR EVERYONE by Hawthorne Daniel

PUBLIC LIBRARIES FOR EVERYONE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This book has its place -- and its market. But one can, even so, regret the fact that an opportunity to give the subject color and vitality is sacrificed to the presumed necessity of packing in the pertinent facts. Actually, what Hawthorne Daniel has set out to do is to trace the progress of the Library Service Act in its various ramifications, developments and regional operation. He has done this against a competent but uninspired history of the public library taking shape as part of the American scene:-its sparse and inadequate beginnings, the figures such as Dewey and Milam who gave it the impetus that brought it to the point where the Library Service Act could be conceived and executed. A few- very few- other figures emerge, but there is little flavor of the varieties of experience attendant on the growth across the nation, whether in city, town, county, rural or state library level. Someday perhaps this story will be told. The bulk of the space is reserved for careful accounting of the implementation of the Library Service Act, and this should be of concern to librarians, to library schools, and to those numerous organizations dealing with libraries, and needing background on the new shape of library operation. But for the general reader, this holds little interest.

Publisher: Doubleday