DUSK AT THE MOUNTAIN: The Negro, The Nation, and The Capital -- A Report on Problems and Progress by Haynes Johnson

DUSK AT THE MOUNTAIN: The Negro, The Nation, and The Capital -- A Report on Problems and Progress

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This award-winning reporter for the Washington Star is clearly devoted to his historic city, despite its many problems. For years he has been researching the capital's race relations situation, visiting slum-dwellers, suburbanites, businessmen, of both races storefront churches, student meetings, government offices, and other places where information about Washington Negroes may be found. He has appraised the significant elements of progress over the years by contrasting them with conditions still to be remedied: he reports on school integration, real estate exploitation, civic organizations, neglect of the trade apprenticeship program, student political activity, the Black Muslim movement, leadership problems, and the strides that have been made in the legal field. ""Population figures have become an emotional topic in Washington,"" he remarks, now that Negroes number almost 54% of the city's residents, but expectations are that whites, who fled to the outlying areas, will be returning to central city as suburban living begins to pall and traffic congestion worsens. Johnson believes Washington's race attitudes set the pace for the entire country because white eyes are on the capital and also because historically, Negroes have thought of Washington as the example in their fight for equal rights.

Pub Date: Jan. 4th, 1962
Publisher: Doubleday