Health & Medicine Book Reviews

Beyond Embarrassment by JoAnne Lake
Released: Dec. 1, 2015

"An invaluable resource for NB sufferers."
Lake's debut offers a candid memoir of her experience with neurogenic bladder and a wealth of practical advice about coping with its daily complications. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 24, 2015

"A levelheaded, well-researched analysis of the many 'trappings of contemporary breastfeeding culture.'"
The pros and cons of using breast milk instead of formula for your baby. Read full book review >

WHEN THE SUN BURSTS by Christopher Bollas
Released: Nov. 24, 2015

"A vastly informative, coherent, and valuable assessment; useful and accessible for both mental health professionals and laypeople—even those who don't share the author's unique perspectives and treatment alternatives."
A contemporary appraisal of schizophrenia and its puzzling traits and treatments through the lens of a physician's esteemed 40-year practice. Read full book review >
CONCUSSION by Jeanne Marie Laskas
Released: Nov. 24, 2015

"Effectively sobering. Suffice it to say that Pop Warner parents will want to armor their kids from head to toe upon reading it."
A maddening, well-constructed tale of medical discovery and corporate coverup, set in morgues, laboratories, courtrooms, and football fields. Read full book review >
GRATITUDE by Oliver Sacks
Released: Nov. 24, 2015

"If that promise of clarity is what awaits us all, then death doesn't seem so awful, and that is a great gift from Sacks. A fitting, lovely farewell."
Valediction from the late neurologist and writer Sacks (On the Move: A Life, 2015, etc.).Read full book review >

Released: Nov. 19, 2015

"An imperative analysis that begs for discussion by industry watchdogs and consumers alike."
A succinct, disturbing report on the prevalence of malpractice in modern medicine. Read full book review >
THE HIDDEN HALF OF NATURE by David R. Montgomery
Released: Nov. 16, 2015

"A must-read for avid gardeners, those interested in bolstering our precarious food supply, or anyone remotely concerned about their health and the soil under their feet."
A geologist and a biologist and environmental planner chronicle the transformation of their desolate Seattle backyard into a fertile garden and how they learned about the importance of beneficial microbes in their newly revived soil. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"High-quality advocacy certain to stir debate."
The president and CEO of the Goldwater Institute makes a convincing case that the slow pace of the Federal Drug Administration's development and approval process for new medications is needlessly costing lives. Read full book review >
CURVOLOGY by David Bainbridge
Released: Nov. 7, 2015

"An articulate yet debatable and uneven survey of the endlessly beguiling female form."
The biology, culture, and vanities perennially orbiting the female body. Read full book review >
THE HEALTH GAP by Michael Marmot
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"Marmot is more successful at delineating a social problem than at solving it, but he provides plenty of ammunition for those in position to tackle it."
A close look at the health gap between the richest and better educated and those below them on the socioeconomic scale. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"One of the most absorbing and empowering science histories to hit the shelves in recent years."
One of the world's most renowned and forward-thinking oncologists recounts 35 years of cancer research and tells us why we should be optimistic about the future. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 1, 2015

"A brave and honest memoir of mental illness and the many people it can affect."
A popular Portland radio talk show host's account of her painful marriage to a bipolar man who eventually committed suicide. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >