Health & Medicine Book Reviews

INFERNO by Steven Hatch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"Despite occasional long-windedness, Hatch's analysis is intelligent, nuanced, and tempered, a necessary departure from the panicked response of most American media outlets."
An American doctor describes his experiences in Liberia during the 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic. Read full book review >
HOW EMOTIONS ARE MADE by Lisa Feldman Barrett
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 7, 2017

"A highly informative, readable, and wide-ranging discussion of 'how psychology, neuroscience, and related disciplines are moving away from the search for emotion fingerprints and instead asking how emotions are constructed.'"
A well-argued, entertaining disputation of the prevailing view that emotion and reason are at odds. Read full book review >

HAZARD by Margaret Combs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"A touching, highly poignant portrait of how family dynamics can survive despite disability and seemingly insurmountable challenges."
A sister struggles with her brother's autism while growing up and seeking personal fulfillment. Read full book review >
THE INHERITANCE by Niki Kapsambelis
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"An educational and emotional chronicle that should resonate with a wide variety of readers."
In her debut, journalist Kapsambelis builds a compelling narrative about Alzheimer's disease around one North Dakota extended family. Read full book review >
BLITZED by Norman Ohler
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 7, 2017

"Written with dramatic flair (Ohler has published several novels in Germany), this book adds significantly to our understanding of the Third Reich."
An intense chronicle of "systematic drug abuse" in Nazi Germany. Read full book review >

THE MIDDLEPAUSE by Marina Benjamin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 14, 2017

"A thoughtful, morose meditation on aging."
Middle age makes the writer feel "ambushed and laid bare." Read full book review >
THE NEW OLD ME by Meredith Maran
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 14, 2017

"A spirited and moving memoir about how 'it's never too late to try something new.'"
An essayist and nonfiction writer's account of how she was forced to start over after age 60. Read full book review >
THE FAMILY GENE by Joselin Linder
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 14, 2017

"Linder successfully integrates cutting-edge genetic research into her personal quest."
How the author and her family have come to terms with the knowledge that they are the carriers of a fatal genetic mutation. Read full book review >
TEETH by Mary Otto
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: March 14, 2017

"A focused, well-researched depiction of the dental industry's social and cultural relevance and its dire need for reform."
An astute examination of the complex, insular business of oral health care. Read full book review >
IN-BETWEEN DAYS by Teva Harrison
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 14, 2017

"What Harrison has learned through her ordeal is that whatever she is feeling, it is natural to feel—and that, ultimately, all of us are living with the same finite mortality. An impressive graphic memoir."
A devastating and inspiring cancer memoir mixing drawings and essays, hope and dread. Read full book review >
DEADLIEST ENEMY by Michael T. Osterholm
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 14, 2017

"A well-rendered work of popular science. If you don't emerge from it as the neighborhood expert on the flu, you skipped a chapter or two. If you emerge unworried, you missed the point."
Think the Zika virus and Ebola are bad? As a renowned epidemiologist suggests, those are just previews of coming attractions. Read full book review >
NO ONE CARES ABOUT CRAZY PEOPLE by Ron Powers
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 21, 2017

"This hybrid narrative, enhanced by the author's considerable skills as a literary stylist, succeeds on every level."
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Powers (Mark Twain: A Life, 2005, etc.) presents two searing sagas: an indictment of mental health care in the United States and the story of his two schizophrenic sons. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >