Health & Medicine Book Reviews (page 2)

Released: June 9, 2015

"Fascinating reading about an intriguing woman."
Investigative journalist Goldberg (The Means of Reproduction: Sex, Power, and the Future of the World, 2009, etc.) fluidly explores the extraordinary life of Indra Devi (1899-2002), the woman who helped transform the ancient Indian discipline of yoga into a worldwide phenomenon.Read full book review >
Released: June 2, 2015

"With concussions from sports injuries making the news, Elliott's easy-to-read account of his experiences is a valuable contribution to a better understanding of the condition."
Up-close view of living with the harrowing effects of a concussion by a professor of artificial intelligence who kept thorough notes of the experience and shares what he learned about overcoming his severe disabilities. Read full book review >

THE THEFT OF MEMORY by Jonathan Kozol
Released: June 2, 2015

"A compassionate, cathartic, and searingly intimate chronicle of a crippling condition."
An errant son memorializes the devastating impact of his father's struggle with Alzheimer's disease. Read full book review >
Eat It Later by Michael Alvear
Released: June 1, 2015

"A wellness strategy that's more about changing the way one thinks about food than about controlling every morsel that passes one's lips."
A weight-loss guide that relies on the power of delayed gratification to reach one's goals. Read full book review >
DO NO HARM by Henry Marsh
Released: May 26, 2015

"Beautifully written and deeply moving—one of the best physician memoirs in recent memory."
A British neurosurgeon delivers fascinating, often harrowing stories of several dozen cases intermixed with compelling digressions into his travels, personal life, and philosophy. Read full book review >

Macaroni Isn't The Same Without Cheese by Qian Yuan
Released: May 21, 2015

"A helpful book for readers seeking to better understand the physical and emotional challenges of EoE."
Yuan and Rotter's (Eating Isn't Always Easy, 2012) short book about eosinophilic esophagitis is a creative resource for elementary school-aged children dealing with a complicated medical condition.Read full book review >
HEAD CASE by Cole Cohen
Released: May 19, 2015

"A beautifully wrenching memoir as piercing as smelling salts."
The story of a woman with a hole in her brain the size of a lemon. Read full book review >
Released: May 11, 2015

"A rare self-help guide that delivers the perfect balance of facts and memoir."
A critical care nurse imparts the importance of health literacy through facts and personal history. Read full book review >
Released: May 5, 2015

"An intelligent rallying cry for anyone seeking a safe and healthy food supply, and all that entails."
When a book begins with an essay titled "A Food Manifesto for the Future," you know the author is on a mission. Read full book review >
10% HUMAN by Alanna Collen
Released: May 5, 2015

"Everything you wanted to know about microbes but were afraid to ask."
This state-of-the-science survey explores and explains what is known about the microbial community that lives within us and what we have yet to learn. Read full book review >
Released: April 28, 2015

"An exigent, affecting summons to rediscover the night."
A celebration of the life-enriching—indeed, indispensable—properties of the night. Read full book review >
DREAMLAND by Sam Quinones
Released: April 21, 2015

"A compellingly investigated, relentlessly gloomy report on the drug distribution industry."
Discouraging, unflinching dispatches from America's enduring opiate-abuse epidemic. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >