Health & Medicine Book Reviews (page 208)

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 15, 1995

"Blankenhorn's depiction of fatherlessness as the cause rather than a symptom of greater social ills will rankle in some quarters, and his agenda for remedying the situation will amuse more far- seeing social critics."
Fatherlessness is the root of every social evil, says Blankenhorn, who calls for a return of the Good Family Man and government enforcement of the ``father role.'' According to Blankenhorn, founder of the Institute for American Values, the fact that 40 percent of America's children do not live with their biological fathers is the leading cause of crime, adolescent pregnancy, child sexual abuse, and domestic violence against women. Read full book review >
SEX IS NOT A NATURAL ACT by Leonore Tiefer
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 6, 1995

"Despite a few too many chapters and a few too many repetitions, Tiefer handles her challenge to the study of sexuality with poise."
A variation on the nature/nurture debate that comes down forcefully on the side of nurture to challenge the assumption that sex is natural. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"This delightful book makes the future of medicine seem brighter."
A collection of gracefully written short pieces narrated by a thoughtful, sensitive young woman in the process of becoming a doctor. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Written with heart and insight, the text stimulates ideas about gender, but it is lacking in concrete evidence."
An overly optimistic analysis of the potential for sexual liberation. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Still, Waldron's painful honesty and absorbing insights make this book valuable reading."
A penetrating first-person account of a mother-daughter reunion, by freelance writer and editor Waldron. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 18, 1995

"They will make agreeable companions for those anglophone readers who don't find their Parisian intellectual millieu too recherchÇ."
These transcripts of discussions by two French intellectuals— a man and a woman—about relations between the sexes make for generally delightful reading. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Jan. 14, 1995

"Close to being a sermon, but redeemed by its brisk and lively style."
From President Carter's secretary of health, education, and welfare, a clarion call for a cultural revolution in how we think about health. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 10, 1995

A cogently narrated personal exploration of the pain of raising black boys in a society that the author sees as fearing black men and indifferent to their survival. Read full book review >
LIFE AND HOW TO SURVIVE IT by Robin Skynner
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 9, 1995

"Child'' and insisted on heavy editing and strong shaping, this work might have moved beyond self-help mediocrity."
You'd think Monty Python creator Cleese tackling health, happiness, and life after death would make for hilarious reading. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"Rosenberg reviews all the findings about food and specific bodily breakdowns in alphabetical order from acne (no, chocolate doesn't aggravate it) to vaginal yeast infection (yes, yogurt does work—but not the frozen kind). (First printing of 250,000)"
Writer Jane Stern, that tireless observer of American fads and fancies, recently noted that today's puritan eating obsessions represent a new culinary idea: Food is medicine. Read full book review >
HOSPITAL by Sydney Lewis
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A mountain of raw material out of which a useful book could have been shaped."
In her debut, Studs Terkel protÇgÇe Lewis fumbles an attempt to create a portrait of Chicago's Cook County Hospital by recording the voices of its staff and a few patients. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 1, 1995

"A solid use of provocative historical cases to raise new questions in the contemporary child-care debates, but with its rough style and chaotically veering judgments, it doesn't provide answers."
An intriguing but weakly argued introduction to an underexplored subject. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kathleen Kent
author of THE DIME
February 20, 2017

Dallas, Texas is not for the faint of heart. Good thing for Betty Rhyzyk she's from a family of take-no-prisoners Brooklyn police detectives. But in Kathleen Kent’s new novel The Dime, her Big Apple wisdom will only get her so far when she relocates to The Big D, where Mexican drug cartels and cult leaders, deadbeat skells and society wives all battle for sunbaked turf. Betty is as tough as the best of them, but she's deeply shaken when her first investigation goes sideways. Battling a group of unruly subordinates, a persistent stalker, a formidable criminal organization, and an unsupportive girlfriend, the unbreakable Detective Betty Rhyzyk may be reaching her limit. “Violent, sexy, and completely absorbing,” our critic writes in a starred review. “Kent's detective is Sam Spade reincarnated—as a brilliant, modern woman.” View video >