Health & Medicine Book Reviews (page 208)

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 3, 1993

"Anyone interested in menopause should turn instead to Gail Sheehy's The Silent Passage or Germaine Greer's The Change. (Illustrations)"
Given the title, as well as the neo-Castanedan spiritual odyssey that the author has undertaken in the past (Shakkai, 1992; The Woman of Wyrrd, 1990; etc.), Andrews's newest journey is ironically physical, even clinical, seeming to contradict her own thesis that a spiritual awakening compensates for the physical losses occasioned by menopause. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Love may be a many-splendored thing, but Baldwin's palette is too bland to capture its essence. (Drawings and photographs- -not seen)"
Sketchy vignettes of 38 relationships, some romantic and enduring and some not, the subtitle notwithstanding. Read full book review >

GRIEVING by Ruth Pollack Coughlin
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"While those who have suffered a loss many appreciate Coughlin's memoir, others will wish for less self-absorption and more about Bill, so that they might participate in the author's grief rather than witnessing it with a mixture of pity and impatience."
Raw outpouring of loss that's by turns moving and trying, by the widow of the recently deceased novelist and judge William J. Coughlin. Read full book review >
THE WINNER WITHIN by Pat Riley
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Engaging, down-to-earth advisories from a master of the game."
Winning, if demanding, prescriptions for success from one of the NBA's best coaches. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Abraham doesn't pretend to have the answers—but she illuminates the problems with passion and skill."
Cool yet compassionate eyewitness report of an inner-city black family's struggle to cope with sickness and poverty. Read full book review >

CODE BLUE by Edward R. Annis
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Strident and rancorous rhetoric by an experienced partisan- -one who knows how to attack but fails to persuade."
Ill-tempered invective by a former president of the American Medical Association, railing against bureaucrats, malpractice lawyers, the press, and others whose morals or behavior offend him—and demanding a return to the days when doctors were ``well respected'' and medical care was ``available to all regardless of ability to pay.'' ``The Golden Age of Medicine'' is how Annis describes the era before LBJ's Great Society programs, when the author, now an octogenarian, was practicing family medicine and general surgery in Florida. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"An engrossing look at a shadowy area of American life—and the dark underbelly of the Reagan years. (Eight pages of photographs)"
A startling portrayal of life at the frayed edges of the American Dream—of drag shows, transvestite hustlers, teenage hookers, flophouses—and murder most foul. Read full book review >
A SEASON IN THE AIR by Thomas Simmons
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A fascinating yet disturbing look at flying and self- discovery."
An unusual melding of the author's experiences as a pilot and his hunger to take control of his life. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Aug. 25, 1993

"A well-done study. (Line drawings—not seen)"
What did Moses, Van Gogh, Lewis Carroll, and Dostoyevsky have in common? Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Aug. 25, 1993

"A decidedly challenging book."
The thesis of this most interesting book by a Cambridge University psychologist (Richards) and a sociologist (Reibstein) is that the institution of modern marriage is ``inherently unstable'' because it's based on a set of impossible ideals. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Aug. 4, 1993

"Inspirational—though Brontâ's largely anecdotal evidence may not convince everyone of the joys of aging."
An optimistic view of the graying of America, created by focusing on the success stories of a select group of working elderly. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Aug. 3, 1993

"Well-considered and convincing arguments designed to stimulate private thought and public discussion; of special interest to medical ethicists and health-care policy-makers."
A provocative analysis of how our attitudes toward our own mortality underlie society's health-care policies, especially regarding care of the dying and termination of medical treatment, as well as laws on living wills, euthanasia, and assisted suicide. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >