Health & Medicine Book Reviews (page 209)

THE LOST ART OF HEALING by Bernard Lown
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Thoughtful essays and thought-provoking stories offering hope that medicine has not yet entirely lost its human face."
The engaging memoirs of a distinguished physician who uses human interest stories to get across his message that healing the patient must once again be the focus of medicine. Read full book review >
PRIVILEGED HANDS by Geerat Vermeij
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"Uplifting'' may smack of sentimentality, but Vermeij's life story surely is uplifting—and it contributes importantly to evolutionary science."
There are multiple stories, both personal and scientific, in this remarkable life of a blind scientist. Read full book review >

HARD LABOR by Susan L. Diamond
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"As an insider's look at current hospital obstetrical practices, this has the ring of truth, but the details of so many births become repetitious, and the author's emotional ups and downs tend to get in the way of her central message."
A rambling, highly personal memoir cum exposÇ by a labor-and-delivery nurse fed up with the American way of birth. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"After reading this absorbing autobiography, readers will too. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
Just what one would expect from the no-nonsense Elders: an unvarnished account that tells as much about our society as about her remarkable life. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"A mostly dull, often repetitious exercise in self-indulgence."
Rather tedious ramblings of a middle-aged, handicapped lesbian trying to decide whether her spiritual home is a Zen center in California or a meditation retreat in New York. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 24, 1996

"A relatively challenging exploration of the aspects of change at midlife, including spiritual and physical growth."
A short course in Jungian psychology aimed at the Baby Boomer, wherein Jung's basic tenets are embellished with Sufi thought, familiar Buddhist parables, and reflections from Teilhard de Chardin. Read full book review >
I WANT TO THANK MY BRAIN FOR REMEMBERING ME by Jimmy Breslin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 19, 1996

"The Bard of the Boroughs is back with his accustomed wit in a chiaroscuro text that is more felicitous than the awkward title would hint."
Prototypical ink-in-the-veins journalist Breslin (Damon Runyon, 1991; The Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight, 1969; etc.) now reports on a matter that concentrated his mind wonderfully, a matter for which his experience never prepared him: the opening of his skull to release an aneurysm. Read full book review >
A DESPERATE PASSION by Helen Caldicott
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 16, 1996

"A treat for Caldicott's many admirers. (16 pages photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
A maverick's life, told with grace and good humor. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 12, 1996

"Replete with personal anecdotes and references to contemporary literature, this is an appealing but ultimately shallow piece of feel-good pop theology. (Author tour)"
An unconventional reading of the Garden of Eden story, offering the best-selling rabbi's suggestions about its psychological implications for the children of Adam and Eve. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"An eloquent self-examination without self-pity that helps resolve the now-common struggles of 30-plus women who face not only infertility but the conflict between society's expectations and personal fulfillment."
This low-key exploration of belatedly (age 40) wanting and not being able to conceive a baby is uncommonly sensitive and revealing. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"But where else can you discover that pregnant mares' urine may have once been a form of transsexual hormone therapy? (photos, drawings, not seen)"
A chatty, erudite introduction to one of the least publicized areas of archaeology: the sexual practices and attitudes of our prehistoric ancestors. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Although Davis might have been better advised to scale down, this is an exceptional tale of 20th-century scientific exploration and a rousing travelogue to places both real and illusory. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A fascinating narrative of the exploits of Harvard ethnobotanist Richard Evans Schultes, interwoven with the much more benign adventure of his student, author and ethnobotanist Davis (The Serpent and the Rainbow, 1986). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >