Health & Medicine Book Reviews (page 209)

HIDDEN HISTORIES OF SCIENCE by Robert B. Silvers
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1995

"An excellent examination of important issues in the biological sciences; a companion volume discussing the physical sciences in similar style and depth would be a welcome addition to the New York Review catalogue."
Based on a series of popular lectures at the New York Public Library, this collection features original essays by leading writers and thinkers in the sciences: Jonathan Miller, Stephen Jay Gould, Daniel J. Kevles, R.C. Lewontin, and Oliver Sacks. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1995

PG-rated autobiography of a young man's coming-of-age in a black Baltimore ghetto. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 19, 1995

"An excellent starting point for fuller study, thanks to a well-annotated reading list that includes popular texts as well as primary sources."
This detailed account of the role of microbes in human history offers an important corrective to the widespread belief that exercise, hygiene, and the right diet are all you need to live a long and healthy life. Read full book review >
THE BLUE JAY'S DANCE by Louise Erdrich
NON-FICTION
Released: April 18, 1995

"Occasionally too self-conscious about the importance of Erdrich's role as Writer, but the bond between mother and infant has rarely been captured so well."
Astute, poetic reflections on the powerful mother-daughter relationship from conception through the baby's first year. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 12, 1995

"Serviceable, but this rather drab account would have been livelier if Wrigley had included some anecdotes and quoted more from first-person narratives."
An examination of the friction that often arises between parents and the caregivers they entrust with their children. Read full book review >

NON-FICTION
Released: April 12, 1995

"No facile synthesis of the two systems here, but rather a thoughtful account that allows their paths to converge and diverge without losing sight of the distinctive contributions of each to deeper self-understanding."
An intriguing, if only partly successful, effort to apply Buddhist insights, particularly from meditation, to patient- therapist dynamics. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

More pithy reductionism from Gray (What Your Mother Couldn't Tell You and Your Father Didn't Know, 1994, etc.). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"If the book has a weakness, it's the final chapter on current understanding and treatment of stuttering: a touch lackluster compared with the lively and amusing history that precedes it."
A surprisingly entertaining essay on stuttering, chock full of hey-listen-to-this and did-you-ever-know-that anecdotes, plus, for sufferers, an account of a therapy that worked for the author. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"But it is highly recommended for medical ethicists and anyone concerned about the AIDS epidemic and how HIV research is conducted."
Painstaking analysis of the knotty ethical problems involved in human-subjects research, and a well-thought-out proposal for a community approach to conducting field trials for an HIV vaccine. Read full book review >
NO VOICE IS EVER WHOLLY LOST by Louise J. Kaplan
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"Occasionally bogged down in overanalysis, but generally a probing, sensitive, and finely crafted work that deserves a wide readership among clinicians and laypeople."
A wide-ranging, profound study of how the primal human dialogue between parent and child continues after the death of one partner through various adaptive strategies by the survivor. Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 1995

"That's for sure. (First serial to Good Housekeeping, Modern Maturity, and Penthouse; Literary Guild main selection; author tour)"
More Wisdom Lite from the Seattle sage (All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten, 1988, etc.). Read full book review >
NON-FICTION
Released: March 31, 1995

"And that's not bad at all. (line drawings)"
Holland (One's Company, 1992, etc.) presents a collection of exemplary little essays in praise of a lot of her favorite things. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >