Health & Medicine Book Reviews (page 211)

DEATH by Greg Palmer
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A scrapbook of tidbits rather than a thought-out narrative; still, an enjoyable scamper through undiscovered country. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
A sprawling survey of death practices around the world; a companion volume to a forthcoming PBS series. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"While Gonzalez-Crussi brings some levity to his subject here, the overall tone is serious—appropriately so—and should stir readers into their own memento mori."
The genesis for this latest collection of elegant essays from Gonzalez-Crussi (Pathology/Children's Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University; On the Nature of Things Erotic, 1988, etc.) was a BBC TV-series that started out to be a sort of day-in- the-life-of... but soon came to focus on death and dying. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A worthy message—but likely to appeal mostly to citizens of the Age of Aquarius. (Twelve b&w photographs—not seen)"
A mother finds spiritual and personal growth in raising her Down's syndrome son. Read full book review >
PAIN by Paul Brand
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 27, 1993

"Valuable for its insight into pain; unforgettable for its glimpses into the lives of lepers."
The engaging memoirs of a physician whose professional life has revolved around pain—and who packs his personal story with solid information on how and why we experience pain and how we can manage it. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 27, 1993

"Altogether, much useful advice about handling some of life's major health risks."
An uneven but good-humored attempt to lighten the task of making health decisions. Read full book review >

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 25, 1993

"An assertive, odd, reductive reading of a familiar and complex cultural phenomenon that the Greeks identified as eros and thanatos."
A vivid but quirky survey of what Osborne (Paris Dreambook, 1991; Ania Malina, 1987) calls ``sexual pessimism''—the association between sexual pleasure and death—which he traces to the Gnostics, the pre-Christian sect that gave creative power to evil and held carnal pleasure in contempt. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 25, 1993

"Starkman's self-focus diminishes the struggles of thousands of other families trying to reconcile responsibilities to aging parents and growing children without strangling the creativity of the middle years."
A curious compendium of self-oriented reflections on the four years Starkman helped care for her mother-in-law. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 20, 1993

"First-rate science for the nonscientist that's certain to reduce stress—at least during the time spent reading it. (Forty- two illustrations—not seen)"
Entertaining explanation of how stress affects the body and what we can do to counteract its effects. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 13, 1993

"But her real purpose here isn't to prescribe or analyze deeply—it's just to hold the mirror up to marriage, which she does with good nature and her trademark wit. (Thirty-fived b&w photographs; ten line drawings)"
A sassy gazetteer by Barreca (English and Feminist Theory/Univ. of Connecticut; They Used To Call Me Snow White, 1991) that explores the modern matrimonial state from all angles, kicking up plenty of facts, fictions, and jokes along the way. Read full book review >
HOW TO HANDLE TROUBLE by John Carmody
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Reliable counsel for sufferers everywhere."
Veteran author Carmody (Religion/University of Tulsa; Contemporary Catholic Theology, 1980, etc.) delivers a soft- spoken primer on how to deal with times of crisis. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A touching portrayal of the plight of women forced to give up their babies—although Jones's solution seems inadequately considered. (First serial to New Woman)"
Candid, often moving report on the experiences of some 70 women who gave up their babies for adoption. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Persuasive, straightforward, and worthy of attention in the ongoing national debate."
Crisp, clear analysis of health care—from the perspective of a businessman who applies a systems approach and focuses on the financial incentives that drive the system. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >