Health & Medicine Book Reviews (page 212)

SLEEP WITH THE ANGELS by Mary Fisher
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Individually, the pieces are touching—but repetition robs them of much of their impact."
Inspirational speeches—along with autobiographical material—given from May 1992 through June 1993 by Fisher, former White House staffer in the Ford Administration, AIDS activist, and founder of the Family AIDS Network. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"A delightful and informative survey that puts medicine into perspective as just another endeavor fraught with all the usual human frailties. (Thirty-nine illustrations)"
Idiosyncratic, crotchety—and very funny—history of medicine by the British author of Doctor in the House (which launched the popular 1950's-60's film and TV series) and a slew of other novels with a medical theme. Read full book review >

SEX by Harry Maurer
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Too haphazard and noninterpretive to rank with the comparable oral-history of S&M sex, Different Loving (p. 498)—but, still, opening a clear window onto the sex lives of the neighbors, for those bold enough to peep in. (First serial to Playboy)"
What do people actually do in bed? Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Dec. 8, 1993

Here's a radical approach to children's TV—from an academic who doesn't see it as the root of violence, hedonism, and low reading scores. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Dec. 6, 1993

"Richard was found guilty and is serving life behind bars—but the evidence in the case, confounding and contradictory, is hardly clarified by Gray's often melodramatic treatment. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
The fatal poisoning in 1991 of Dallas socialite Nancy Lyon has all the ingredients for a solid true-crimer: big money; a philandering husband; incest; ambiguous evidence; courtroom drama. Read full book review >

THE WITHERING CHILD by John A. Gould
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"Except for the extraneous travelogue: an unusually powerful story of a family in crisis."
A family drama and a literary guidebook uneasily cohabiting within the same covers—the former riveting, the latter frustratingly beside the point. Read full book review >
CIGARETTES ARE SUBLIME by Richard Klein
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

Many people, deciding to quit smoking, go cold turkey; others use nicotine gum or a patch. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 11, 1993

"Challenging ideas, expressed clearly and forcefully, that go provocatively against the grain of mainstream feminist thinking."
A radical feminist's angry call for an end to reproductive technologies and contracts that she views as violence against women. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 10, 1993

"Should be of keen interest to men, too."
What 150 women answered in response to a questionnaire that Bouris (coauthor, Random Acts of Kindness—not reviewed) distributed nationwide, asking about women's first experiences of sexual intercourse—or, in the case of lesbians, first sexual encounters. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 8, 1993

"Opinions will differ, but Herbert proves to be a reliable guide on this journey through the looking glass."
A physicist's daring investigation of mind and its relation to matter. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Flawed by Levine's endless snarling and a sometime sluggish style—but undeniably the real nitty-gritty at its core. (Eight- page b&w photo insert—not seen)"
Former DEA agent Levine's account of his South American sting operation to capture major cocaine traffickers—a sting, he claims, that was sabotaged by the CIA. Read full book review >
DEATH by Greg Palmer
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"A scrapbook of tidbits rather than a thought-out narrative; still, an enjoyable scamper through undiscovered country. (Eight pages of b&w photographs—not seen)"
A sprawling survey of death practices around the world; a companion volume to a forthcoming PBS series. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >