Health & Medicine Book Reviews (page 212)

A WOMAN'S BOOK OF GRIEVING by Nessa Rapoport
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 1, 1994

"12 lithographs. (Book-of-the-Month alternate selection)"
An elegant collection of prose-poems and verses characterized by an extreme compression of language—perhaps the only way to respect the failure of words to capture grief while insisting, nevertheless, on speaking. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 1, 1994

"High marks for being both instructive and entertaining."
A demanding but rewarding report that illuminates what neurology can now tell us about the human brain. Read full book review >

MOTHERLESS DAUGHTERS by Hope Edelman
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 1, 1994

"Many women will find this book painful, but it's reassuring to have the company of others when dealing with the complex emotions and lifelong effects of a mother's loss."
According to the testimony in this oddly comforting volume, women never get over missing dead or absent mothers, whether they were 2 or 22 or even 52 at the time of loss. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 1, 1994

"Despite stylistic flaws, a valuable resource on the politics of women's health."
In Unequal Treatment, Nechas and Foley (Women's Encyclopedea of Health and Emotional Healing, not reviewed) argue that bias against women in medical research and practice has had a detrimental, often deadly, effect on women's health. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 1, 1994

"One long kvetch that health care reformers can safely ignore."
A collection of doctor-bashing stories and gripes about medical care compiled by a father-son team in the health care industry. Read full book review >

GARDENING IN CLAY by Ronald O. Valdiserri
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: May 1, 1994

"Gardening in Clay has moments of insight, but its sentimentality and lack of subtlety hinder it from a more profound engagement with its subject."
A sometimes moving but often frustratingly evasive collection of meditations on AIDS by a physician who has lost his twin brother to the disease. Read full book review >
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: April 27, 1994

"Light and lively fare—containing just enough facts to satisfy."
A bright, breezy, and opinionated look at how the Food and Drug Administration has handled and mishandled its job in the past decade. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 27, 1994

"Ultimately, though, the book is imbalanced and unconvincing, despite its passion."
An useful though biased and histrionic account of the adopted person's struggle to form ``an authentic sense of self.'' Lifton (Lost and Found, 1979; Twice Born, 1975) continues to explore the struggles and journeys of adopted people. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 27, 1994

"Pool captures the resourcefulness of the researchers, the voices of those who made the discoveries and tested them in their own lives."
Through shrewdly selected examples and engaging interviews with researchers, science journalist Pool (Science, Discover, Nature, etc.) assembles a convincing argument to explain the biological basis of sexual differences. Read full book review >
ADVERSE REACTIONS by Thomas Maeder
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 26, 1994

"Meticulously researched and documented; a valuable addendum to the literature on drug safety."
Intense scrutiny of the rise and fall of the antibiotic chloramphenicol (trade name: Chloromycetin) that raises tough questions about the marketing and use of drugs. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: April 14, 1994

"In all, provocative and accomplished."
Stacey, a magazine journalist, contends that Americans have become paranoid about food, especially about fat, and that our fears have taken the pleasure out of eating. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: April 13, 1994

"Sexist advice more suited to old-fashioned women's magazines. (First serial to Parade)"
Pop psychologist Brothers', (Widowed, 1990; The Successful Woman, 1988) easy-answer tactics for women suffering from low self- esteem are unlikely to help those who are in serious trouble. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >