Health & Medicine Book Reviews (page 3)

HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 28, 2016

"An intensely, deeply argued recasting of what it means to be healthy that may pose difficulties for patients but provides solid evidence for effective prevention strategies.
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An ambitious book presents a revolutionary approach to fitness, diet, and exercise. Read full book review >
SWITCHED ON by John Elder Robison
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"A fascinating companion to the previous memoirs by this masterful storyteller."
The bestselling author shares his experience as a participant in a cutting-edge study of the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation on the brains of people on the autism spectrum. Read full book review >

THE CRIME OF ALL CRIMES by Nicole Rafter
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 22, 2016

"A comparative criminological approach to genocide, bloodless in pursuit of scientific inquiry and most appropriate for students and specialists."
A criminologist attempts to understand genocide and its etiology. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 22, 2016

"A revealing and stirring directive aiming to heal medicine from the inside out."
A career physician ponders the positive and negative aspects of how health care reform is transforming the delivery of care and the medical profession itself. Read full book review >
Survival: A Medical Memoir by Lorne J. Brandes
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 18, 2016

"A personal, lively, and scientifically rigorous account of cancer-treatment research."
Brandes offers an absorbing, exhaustive true story about the obstacles researchers faced while ushering a new cancer drug through development and testing. Read full book review >

THE FEVER OF 1721 by Stephen Coss
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 8, 2016

"A solid first book in which impressive documentation undergirds an ambitious assertion."
In his debut, Wisconsin-based historian Coss examines the Colonial smallpox epidemic and how it influenced the forging of American identity and politics. Read full book review >
A BODY, UNDONE by Christina Crosby
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"A potent memoir that rips open a most human heart."
One moment, she is on her bicycle; the next, she is on the ground, her life forever transformed by an accident that leaves her a quadriplegic. Read full book review >
HOPE FOR A COOL PILLOW by Margaret Overton
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2016

"A timely, informed contribution to the ongoing debate over our nation's health care policies."
A moving argument for the reform of end-of-life care. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 2016

"A useful and educative primer introducing but not elaborating on a new clinical perspective on addiction."
A lucid examination of addiction and treatment from a neurobiological perspective. Read full book review >
HERDING HEMINGWAY'S CATS by Kat Arney
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 2016

"A robust, bouncy, pellucid introduction to DNA and genetics."
A survey of recent research and thinking on genes. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 2016

"An intriguing exploration of a unique hypothesis with broad implications."
An exploration of the quest for a link between high-functioning autistic individuals and child prodigies, co-authored by mother-daughter team Ruthsatz (Psychology/Ohio State Univ.) and journalist Stephens. Read full book review >
LABOR INTENSIVE by Natalie Wyler
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 29, 2016

"A knowledgeable, adrenaline-infused portrait of the realities of nursing, written with palpable passion."
Vivid dispatches from the "often battlefield-like conditions" of an inner city labor and delivery unit. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >