Health & Medicine Book Reviews (page 3)

THE DIET MYTH by Tim Spector
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"A concise, entertaining book that demystifies the benefits of balanced microbes through healthier eating."
Spector (Genetic Epidemiology/King's Coll. London; Identically Different: Why We Can Change Our Genes, 2013) asserts that essential digestive microbes are major determinants of body composition. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 2, 2015

"As the author notes early on, health care is one of the few areas where people willingly cede control over to others, but with this useful book, patients can have more say over what direction treatment takes rather than just going along for the ride."
A primer on making the right moves as an active participant in your health care. Read full book review >

Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"A brief, genuine, heartfelt memoir of an awe-inspiring life."
A South African nurse's memoir of how she escaped grinding poverty to become a beloved advocate for and caretaker of homeless children. Read full book review >
ESCAPE POINTS by Michele Weldon
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Weldon pins life to the mat in this valiant, passionate, purposeful memoir."
A single mother of three juggles multiple roles as a wrestling mom and a survivor of cancer and an abusive marriage. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"An intelligent, provocative, and inspiring call to arms for those who simply want relief and a return to normalcy."
An eye-opening look at the current status of those suffering from chronic pain. Read full book review >

NEUROTRIBES by Steve Silberman
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"In the foreword, Oliver Sacks writes that this 'sweeping and penetrating history…is fascinating reading' that 'will change how you think of autism.' No argument with that assessment."
A well-researched, readable report on the treatment of autism that explores its history and proposes significant changes for its future. Read full book review >
ALPHA DOCS by Daniel Muñoz
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"Muñoz offers little turning of new ground in what has become a fertile genre, but the book is enjoyably idiosyncratic and elucidative."
From physician Muñoz, a chronicle of becoming a doctor at the extremely demanding Johns Hopkins cardiology program. Read full book review >
UNIQUELY HUMAN by Barry M. Prizant
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"A truly impactful, necessary book."
A remarkable new approach to autism. Read full book review >
BEHIND THE CURTAIN by Jeffrey E. Sterling
Released: July 24, 2015

"Accessible and often amusing medical anecdotes."
Drawing on over 20 years of experience in emergency medicine, debut author Sterling presents alternately humorous and sobering stories of the "controlled chaos" of a hospital emergency room. Read full book review >
ANXIOUS by Joseph LeDoux
Released: July 14, 2015

"Not turgid enough for academia or lucid enough to be quality popular science, the book is a dense, detailed, often stimulating review of how the brain processes external threats."
This is no self-help book but rather a rigorous scientific analysis of brain function, heavy on research and theory. Read full book review >
Released: July 14, 2015

"An urgent call for corporate compassion by a woman with a baby in peril."
A first-person account of a woman who became a cause célèbre following the grievous circumstances of her baby's birth. Read full book review >
Released: July 14, 2015

"A thought-provoking, industry-minded, and polarizing perspective on the neurocircuitry of human desire and compulsion."
An argument against classifying addiction as a chronic "brain disease." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >