Health & Medicine Book Reviews (page 5)

Macaroni Isn't The Same Without Cheese by Qian Yuan
Released: May 21, 2015

"A helpful book for readers seeking to better understand the physical and emotional challenges of EoE."
Yuan and Rotter's (Eating Isn't Always Easy, 2012) short book about eosinophilic esophagitis is a creative resource for elementary school-aged children dealing with a complicated medical condition.Read full book review >
HEAD CASE by Cole Cohen
Released: May 19, 2015

"A beautifully wrenching memoir as piercing as smelling salts."
The story of a woman with a hole in her brain the size of a lemon. Read full book review >

GRAIN OF TRUTH by Stephen Yafa
Released: May 12, 2015

"An appealingly complex narrative of a successful quest, with recipes for the home baker."
Playwright and screenwriter Yafa (Cotton: The Biography of a Revolutionary Fiber, 2004) debunks the claim by "the anti-gluten medical contingent" that wheat is unhealthy because it contains gluten, a protein that supposedly contributes to "obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, dementia and more."Read full book review >
Released: May 12, 2015

"An informative and compassionate chronicle of Heilig's own growth as a physician and researcher."
Heilig sums up what he has learned during his 20 years as a physician and researcher in the treatment of alcohol and other addictive disorders. Read full book review >
Released: May 12, 2015

"Brokaw's account lacks the depth and fire of Christopher Hitchens' Mortality (2013), but it belongs on the same shelf as a wise and oddly comforting look at the toughest news of all."
Veteran news anchor and Greatest Generation chronicler Brokaw (The Time of Our Lives, 2011, etc.) turns inward to report on his battle with cancer.Read full book review >

Released: May 11, 2015

"A rare self-help guide that delivers the perfect balance of facts and memoir."
A critical care nurse imparts the importance of health literacy through facts and personal history. Read full book review >
Where the Monster Weights by Corinne Weber
Released: May 7, 2015

"An affecting but uneven memoir of addiction and overcoming despair."
A young woman narrates the story of her struggles with anorexia. Read full book review >
Released: May 5, 2015

"An intelligent mix of research and pop culture, Caulfield's analysis of celebrity trends gets to the heart of America's obsession with the fame monster."
Caulfield (Health Law and Policy/Univ. of Alberta; The Cure for Everything: Untangling Twisted Messages about Health, Fitness, and Happiness, 2012) dispels the myths of celebrity-endorsed products and the cult of fame that they sell.Read full book review >
Released: May 5, 2015

"An intelligent rallying cry for anyone seeking a safe and healthy food supply, and all that entails."
When a book begins with an essay titled "A Food Manifesto for the Future," you know the author is on a mission. Read full book review >
10% HUMAN by Alanna Collen
Released: May 5, 2015

"Everything you wanted to know about microbes but were afraid to ask."
This state-of-the-science survey explores and explains what is known about the microbial community that lives within us and what we have yet to learn. Read full book review >
Released: May 2, 2015

"A solid compilation of the fundamentals of cancer, its diagnosis, and its treatment."
A guide to common questions regarding cancer, along with a substantial collection of resources. Read full book review >
ON THE MOVE by Oliver Sacks
Released: May 1, 2015

"Despite impressionistic chronology, which occasionally causes confusion and repetition, this is an engaging memoir by a consummate storyteller."
The prolific physician's adventure-filled life. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >