Health & Medicine Book Reviews (page 5)

Survival: A Medical Memoir by Lorne J. Brandes
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 18, 2016

"A personal, lively, and scientifically rigorous account of cancer-treatment research."
Brandes offers an absorbing, exhaustive true story about the obstacles researchers faced while ushering a new cancer drug through development and testing. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 15, 2016

"A hard-hitting look at the perils of carbohydrates and obesity."
A series of articles, this debut book delivers an account of the dangers of carbohydrate consumption—especially for average eaters who rely on grains and sugars to supply the bulk of their daily diets. Read full book review >

THE FEVER OF 1721 by Stephen Coss
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 8, 2016

"A solid first book in which impressive documentation undergirds an ambitious assertion."
In his debut, Wisconsin-based historian Coss examines the Colonial smallpox epidemic and how it influenced the forging of American identity and politics. Read full book review >
A BODY, UNDONE by Christina Crosby
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"A potent memoir that rips open a most human heart."
One moment, she is on her bicycle; the next, she is on the ground, her life forever transformed by an accident that leaves her a quadriplegic. Read full book review >
FOOD & COOKING
Released: March 5, 2016

"A challenging yet inspiring regimen to get and stay healthy in midlife and beyond."
A 50-something fitness expert details her kick-start diet and exercise plan especially designed for aging women in this debut guide. Read full book review >

HOPE FOR A COOL PILLOW by Margaret Overton
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: March 1, 2016

"A timely, informed contribution to the ongoing debate over our nation's health care policies."
A moving argument for the reform of end-of-life care. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 2016

"A useful and educative primer introducing but not elaborating on a new clinical perspective on addiction."
A lucid examination of addiction and treatment from a neurobiological perspective. Read full book review >
HERDING HEMINGWAY'S CATS by Kat Arney
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 2016

"A robust, bouncy, pellucid introduction to DNA and genetics."
A survey of recent research and thinking on genes. Read full book review >
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: March 1, 2016

"An intriguing exploration of a unique hypothesis with broad implications."
An exploration of the quest for a link between high-functioning autistic individuals and child prodigies, co-authored by mother-daughter team Ruthsatz (Psychology/Ohio State Univ.) and journalist Stephens. Read full book review >
LABOR INTENSIVE by Natalie Wyler
HEALTH & MEDICINE
Released: Feb. 29, 2016

"A knowledgeable, adrenaline-infused portrait of the realities of nursing, written with palpable passion."
Vivid dispatches from the "often battlefield-like conditions" of an inner city labor and delivery unit. Read full book review >
REASONS TO STAY ALIVE by Matt Haig
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"A vibrant, encouraging depiction of a sinister disorder."
A British novelist turns to autobiography to report the manifold symptoms and management of his debilitating disease, depression. Read full book review >
SNOWBALL IN A BLIZZARD by Steven Hatch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Hatch ably reveals the shortcomings of medicine but is less successful in providing guidance for those trying to find their ways through the confusion."
An exploration of the uncertainty that lies at the heart of Western medicine. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >