Health & Medicine Book Reviews (page 5)

Released: Oct. 15, 2014

"A gutsy, deeply revealing account that more than fulfills the promise of the subtitle."
Freelance journalist and author Stark (Leaving Mundania: Inside the Transformative World of Live Action Role-Playing Games, 2012) has both fully researched her subject and poured out her heart in this blend of history, science and memoir. Read full book review >
PRO by Katha Pollitt
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"Pollitt's cogent opinion presents potent testimony on a woman's right to choose."
A pro-choice proponent delivers a dramatic, persuasive argument for abortion. Read full book review >

Released: Oct. 13, 2014

"A well-paced, page-turning popular history featuring a lively, character-driven blend of scientific discovery and gender politics."
Former Wall Street Journal reporter Eig (Get Capone: The Secret Plot that Captured America's Most Wanted Gangster, 2010, etc.) recounts the origin story of the oral contraceptive—"the pill"—as a scientific answer to a cultural conundrum: how to have sex without pregnancy. Read full book review >
BEING MORTAL by Atul Gawande
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"A sensitive, intelligent and heartfelt examination of the processes of aging and dying."
A prominent surgeon and journalist takes a cleareyed look at aging and death in 21st-century America. Read full book review >
BOY ON ICE by John Branch
Released: Oct. 1, 2014

"A sad, tragic story that underscores the high human cost of violent entertainment."
Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter Branch debuts with a biography of hockey player Derek Boogaard (1982-2011), a fierce fighter on the ice who died of an overdose of alcohol and prescription painkillers at the age of 28. Read full book review >

Released: Sept. 30, 2014

"Compassionate, useful reading related by an expert in his field."
A renowned neurologist examines some important questions: "[W]hat does it mean to be the patient faced with these seismic problems, and how is a connection made with the physician who embodies the knowledge that can make it better?" Read full book review >
ON IMMUNITY by Eula Biss
Released: Sept. 30, 2014

"Brightly informative, giving readers a sturdy platform from which to conduct their own research and take personal responsibility."
National Book Critics Circle Award winner Biss (Notes from No Man's Land, 2009) investigates the nature of vaccinations, from immunity as myth to the intricate web of the immune system. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 29, 2014

"Holt says that he wrote the book over a period of 10 years. Let's hope for a shorter duration before we next hear from this gifted writer/physician."
Think you've heard it all about the grueling, fatigue-driven years suffered by interns and residents once they get their degrees? Think again. Read full book review >
Hearing Loss: Facts and Fiction by Timothy Frantz
Released: Sept. 26, 2014

"An easy read about the causes of gradual hearing loss and how to cope with it."
A debut guide that may help start a conversation about an underdiagnosed issue that affects 1 in 7 Americans. Read full book review >
Your Healthy Brain by Stephen J. Kiraly
Released: Sept. 26, 2014

"A smart, entertaining read on caring for our gray matter."
A comprehensive guide to the workings, care, and history of the brain. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 13, 2014

"A fascinating look at how Medicare must change."
A gerontologist's take on what is needed to reform Medicare. Read full book review >
ACID TEST by Tom Shroder
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"An observant argument for understanding a society through the drugs it uses."
A well-respected journalist offers evidence, both empirical and anecdotal, about the therapeutic benefits of psychedelic drugs. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >