Health & Medicine Book Reviews

SODA POLITICS by Marion Nestle
Released: Oct. 2, 2015

"A hard-hitting, exceedingly well-documented call for action."
Nestle (Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health/New York Univ.; Why Calories Count: From Science to Politics, 2012, etc.) calls for a campaign to regulate and tax the multibillion-dollar soda industry modeled on the successful anti-smoking campaign.Read full book review >
THE SHIFT by Theresa Brown
Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"An empathetic and absorbing narrative as riveting as a TV drama."
A registered nurse recounts a typical shift. Read full book review >

Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"In this unsparingly honest chronicle, Tweedy cohesively illuminates the experiences of black doctors and black patients and reiterates the need for improved understanding of racial differences within global medical communities."
An arresting memoir that personalizes the enduring racial divide in contemporary American medicine. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 2, 2015

"As the author notes early on, health care is one of the few areas where people willingly cede control over to others, but with this useful book, patients can have more say over what direction treatment takes rather than just going along for the ride."
A primer on making the right moves as an active participant in your health care. Read full book review >
ESCAPE POINTS by Michele Weldon
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Weldon pins life to the mat in this valiant, passionate, purposeful memoir."
A single mother of three juggles multiple roles as a wrestling mom and a survivor of cancer and an abusive marriage. Read full book review >

Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"An intelligent, provocative, and inspiring call to arms for those who simply want relief and a return to normalcy."
An eye-opening look at the current status of those suffering from chronic pain. Read full book review >
NEUROTRIBES by Steve Silberman
Released: Aug. 25, 2015

"In the foreword, Oliver Sacks writes that this 'sweeping and penetrating history…is fascinating reading' that 'will change how you think of autism.' No argument with that assessment."
A well-researched, readable report on the treatment of autism that explores its history and proposes significant changes for its future. Read full book review >
UNIQUELY HUMAN by Barry M. Prizant
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"A truly impactful, necessary book."
A remarkable new approach to autism. Read full book review >
BEHIND THE CURTAIN by Jeffrey E. Sterling
Released: July 24, 2015

"Accessible and often amusing medical anecdotes."
Drawing on over 20 years of experience in emergency medicine, debut author Sterling presents alternately humorous and sobering stories of the "controlled chaos" of a hospital emergency room. Read full book review >
Released: July 14, 2015

"An urgent call for corporate compassion by a woman with a baby in peril."
A first-person account of a woman who became a cause célèbre following the grievous circumstances of her baby's birth. Read full book review >
Just Chaaa...  by David Kearney
Released: June 29, 2015

"A creative, solution-filled book about restoring rest, health, and vitality to one's life."
This short guide to a healthier, more relaxed, and balanced lifestyle posits strategies that are easy and memorable. Read full book review >
BLACKOUT by Sarah Hepola
Released: June 23, 2015

"A treasure trove of hard truths mined from a life soaked in booze."
A razor-sharp memoir that reveals the woman behind the wine glass. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >