VOUZA AND THE SOLOMON ISLANDS by Hector MacQuarrie
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VOUZA AND THE SOLOMON ISLANDS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Often amusing, sometimes amazing, always entertaining picture of pre-war life in the Solomon Islands, and of the people for whom the author- a British colonial administrator- has a warm-hearted love. Vouza is the native Lance Corporal in the constabulary of the Santa Cruz district, and his friendship and poise proved of inestimable help to the author, and is the focal point of this story of the incidents of native life and governmental guidance. With an eye for the ludicrous as well as the more serious side of custom versus law and order, he tells the story of a little pig who thought he was a dog, tales of illness, of Japs, sanitary measures, criminal charges, chapters which give a definite feeling of the character and personalities of the Islanders and the life they lead. Without the travelogue effect of Headhunting in the Solomon Islands and with perhaps deeper understanding of the people, this book should appeal to those who like their education in unfamiliar people lightened with sympathy and humor. It will have very definite interest for men who served in the Pacific area. Might be defined as a masculine counterpart of Land Below the Wind.

Pub Date: July 20th, 1948
Publisher: Macmillan