PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION by Heije Faber

PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Faber, a Dutch theologian, lecturer, and author in pastoral psychology, regards psychoanalysis as such an integral part of the contemporary mindscape and such a valuable interpretative resource that religion--he is thinking primarily of Christianity--must work out a fruitful relationship with it. He launches the needed dialogue (which is farther advanced, at least in the US, than he suggests) in two clumsily mated studies. Part One provides a lucid summary and sensitive evaluation of Freud and Jung's basic concepts and their anti-orthodox views of religion as well as the mellowed attitudes of second-wave figures such as RÃœmke, Fromm, and Erikson. In the more systematic and creative Part Two, he uses Eriksonian theory to show how the phases of psychic development--oral, anal, oedipal, and adolescent--exist in the evolution of religion in history and in individual lives. Faber contends that despite its often restrictive interpretation--particularly its failure to distinguish between natural and revelatory religion--depth psychology gives a unique access to the concrete situation of religion, especially the contemporary ""adolescent"" crisis of Christian faith. A clear and intelligent, rather European introduction to psychology of religion; its Freudian leanings balance the Jungian emphasis (of which Faber seems little aware) in much American discussion.

Pub Date: May 15th, 1976
Publisher: Westminster