ONLY IN TIME by Helen Bratton

ONLY IN TIME

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Only in time, Lyle Meredith discovers that other disadvantages are as serious as a scarred face (to be a Negro, to have parents who ignore you), other advantages comparable to a pretty face (intelligence, musical skill). At sixteen Lyle comes to the National Music Camp hiding behind a scar less conspicuous than she thinks and finds companions who share her love of music and value her company. A first love with dubious ingredients blows hot but cools down at the first slight; more substantial involvement follows with Debby, a talented Negro whose religious fiance wants her to trade her piano for a tambourine, and with John Paul, a serious musician and clever limerick-maker who collaborates with her on a composition. He heals the love scar while the real scar heals itself. Overly explicit and simplistic, but fast and involving for the hand-holding stage.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1967
Publisher: McKay