TWO HOOTS AND THE KING; TWO HOOTS IN THE SNOW by Helen Cresswell

TWO HOOTS AND THE KING; TWO HOOTS IN THE SNOW

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Cresswell has shaped up her Two Hoots formula since the foolish owls' first appearance earlier this year; here the patronizing postscripts (""but you know better, don't you?"") are gone, and the stories, though no more than simple kindergarten jokes, are at least that. In the first of these, the Hoots mistake a yellow bird for ""the king of the sun"" (because the sun is yellow too and is ""king of the day"") and ask him to make them wiser; so he tells them that he is a canary, not the king of the sun--""and now you are a little wiser than you were."" In the second story, Little Hoot mistakes falling snowflakes for the Moon Bird's feathers, and Big Hoot insists that they are white leaves. ""What's it for?"" they ask when told that what they see is snow. ""Silly birds. Snow is snow and that is all there is to it."" With Martine Blanc's blobby cartoons unchanged, it's still not much.

Pub Date: Oct. 9th, 1978
Publisher: Crown (An Early Reader)