A CIRCLE IN THE WATER by Helen Hull
Kirkus Star

A CIRCLE IN THE WATER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A good, meaty, civilized novel of marriage, a marriage that went on the rocks. Perhaps not a particularly profound nor compelling book, but Helen Hull looks below the surface, so that as one reads, one experiences emotionally, as well as intellectually, the problems of the characters. The story starts in a college town -- one shares intimately the closeness of bond between the young college professor and his wife, her pride in his achievement, in his new book, in his promised promotion, in the seal of approval indicated by the invitation to dine at the president's home. And then one shares equally in the disintegration of the marriage, as the husband is unable to meet adverse conditions, and escapes himself in affairs, half known, half sensed, with other women. And finally, divorce -- and remarriage -- the son growing up in a rootless background -- both of them, even in second marriages, feeling the tug of the old relation. Well done -- good characterizations -- plausible situations -- a problem novel for women readers, primarily.

Pub Date: Jan. 11th, 1942
Publisher: Coward, McCann