FRIENDS AND LOVERS by Helen MacInnes

FRIENDS AND LOVERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A facile love story, with little originality of plotting, but with a good deal more development of thought patterns than the usual story of its kind. But there is nothing recognizable Helen MacInnes -- perhaps she has written it to prove she will not be pigeonholed and typed.... The setting is Scotland, where a young Oxford student is tutoring in the household of a classmate and where he experiences ""love at first sight"" wholly against his better judgment. Then the scene shifts to London, where the girl, Penelope, has gone to study art -- and where a good old fashioned story develops as the two young people fall deeper and deeper in love. David throws his diplomatic career plans to the wind, and Penny casts off her family, rather than give in to their disapproval, and makes a career for herself almost overnight. Complete with irate parents, gossiping friends of the family, long sustained scruples over modern ideas of living together before marriage, and the bitter struggle to defeat demon poverty -- this is the sort of ""course of true love never did run smooth"" story that will delight those demanding a wholesome romance, with enough substance to give one something to think about.... Long drawn out -- but countless readers will love it, while the critics gape.

Pub Date: Aug. 11th, 1947
Publisher: Little, Brown