FROM GORKY TO PASTERNAK by Helen Muchule

FROM GORKY TO PASTERNAK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Out of the maze of modern Russian writing, the author has chosen six pre-eminent men to illustrate her theme of totalitarian writing. These men are Gorky, Blok, Myakovsky, Leonov, and Sholokov. Gorky was the literary hero of the Revolution, already internationally known through his play, The Lower Depths, and so honored that his ashes are in the Kremlin wall. His grandmother -- depicted in his autobiography-was an archetypal Russian peasant...Blok, on the other hand, came from an upper middleclass, highly intellectual family. He managed at great cost to sustain his individually during the Revolution, and seems except in time, to belong to the ranks of totalitarian of the Revolution, writing, traveling, lecturing until the true In him rebelled and he committed suicide...Leonov, a writer, seems a minor figure, undeviatingly devoted to the regime... Pasternak's story is too well known to need exposition...Sholokov, author of Quiet Flows the Don, etc. draws his as ""mistaken men"" and walks a tenuous path of accepted loyalty....This is a timely book; its critiques seem , balanced, if not inspired. Dependent to some extent as a groundwork familiarity with Russian literature, it is revealing in its analysis of Revolutionary writers. Should have a scholarly appeal for university and college libraries.

Pub Date: Sept. 26th, 1961
Publisher: Random House