A MAN NAMED GRANT by Helen Todd
Kirkus Star

A MAN NAMED GRANT

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

This is not a ponderously scholarly treatise on a man who is little known, as a man, by the average reader -- but an immensely readable, dramatic and vigorous study of a man who was the toy of fate, the minion of history. It is as absorbing in its sense of suspense as a fine historical novel; one knows, in a general way, what happened, but Miss Todd has succeeded in making each step so vivid that it is a journey of discovery. Students may take exception to some of the interpretation put on the quarrels, the back-biting, the dissension that almost brought defeat to the Union forces,but she has made it thoroughly credible, and Grant emerges from it all, not as an untarnished hero, but as a man who is victim of his own temperament,but not the weakling and sot occasionally depicted. First and last, a man loyal and devoted to his wife and children, this aspect permeates every phase of his career, whether on the down grade or the up grade. The political scandals of his administration, the party manipulations, the attempt -- after the Hayes-Arthur administration -- to put him over for a third time, all are presented in human terms. A revealing and very interesting book, a memorable biography, and another justification -- if one were needed -- for the Houghton, Mifflin fellowship plan.

Pub Date: Aug. 20th, 1940
Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin