LET MY PEOPLE GO: The Story of the Underground Railroad and the Abolition Movement by Henrietts Buckmaster

LET MY PEOPLE GO: The Story of the Underground Railroad and the Abolition Movement

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The story of this great crusade for freedom is a dramatic and moving story in itself. As here presented, the wealth of detail may prove somewhat forbiding to all who are not interested in its scholarly aspects, although it emerges as an exciting historical presentation. The ""Railroad"" started in the swamps; it broke trail through the mountains and the woods to Pennsylvania, where the Quakers set up the first ""station"", and it ended in the best New England parlors. By 1830 many leading citizens were involved, with Garrison a leader. The cause had widespread moral and political repercussions: it entailed periods of insurrection and violence, culminating in Harper's Ferry. Lincoln, the war and Emancipation were the outcome -- though not the final answer. Throughout are stories of the leading figures, Garrison, Lovejoy, Summer, Harriet Tubman, John Brown and others. An exhaustive historical recapitulation, vigorously narrated.

Pub Date: Feb. 19th, 1941
Publisher: Harper