TEEN-AGE TREASURY OF THE ARTS by

TEEN-AGE TREASURY OF THE ARTS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

After a couple of generations of being cozzened and generally catered to, those young people inclined or committed to the creative arts have been getting short shrift lately in a labor market that pants after science and math talent. An inspired search of fiction, biography and autobiography have led the concerned editors to collect these sections of longer works that deal with the moments that adolescents have determined on careers in art. From Act One, comes the story of Moss Hart's start in the theater. From My Sister Eileen, comes the always delightful ""Hungah."" (Delightful as it is, this was a poor choice. It shows a confrontation with ""Culture"" as funny as Ruth McKenney can make it, but she has told of her early dedication to writing in other sketches.) Louisa May Alcott, through the chapter on Jo's literary efforts from Little Women, is still wry commentary on the difference between an author's desire and commercial considerations. ""Drowne's Wooden Image"" by Hawthorne reveals the artistic discipline of a craftsman and there is a morale building excerpt for young dancers and choreographers from Agnes DeMille. One could carp about sources that are missing, nevertheless this is an honest effort that should lead readers to full length books in the areas of their special interests.

Pub Date: Sept. 25th, 1964
Publisher: Funk & Wagnalls