ROGERS' RULES FOR SUCCESS by Henry C. Rogers

ROGERS' RULES FOR SUCCESS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Even Stars Need to Be Told They're Important, and other pointers on ""the art of psychorelations,"" from a top Hollywood PR-man who's made a second career, since writing his memoirs (Walking the Tightrope, 1980), as a success-maven. You'll hear again how self-employed (because unemployed) stripling Rogers struggled to get his first clients into print, came into lucky contact with ""an unknown black-haired beauty named Rita Hayworth,"" and found a mentor in self-possessed, self-respecting talent agent Charlie Feldman: all of which entertainingly illustrates the need for Self-Esteem, Energy, Drive, Will, and Self-Control--plus the value of being likable, visible, well-rounded, and well-attired. The balance comes off best, too, when Rogers works in his personal experiences: how he lost Frank Sinatra as a client (by a blunt answer to a direct question) and kept Audrey Hepburn (by a tactful response in a ticklish situation); how he made a call from the White House to massage an associate's ego, and used a Buckingham-Palace contact to launch another colleague in high, what-the-hell style. When it comes down to cases, some of Rogers' advice--from ""Be the first to arrive. . . in the morning"" to ""Always take the blame""--has a more evident payoff in certain situations than in others. (Taking the blame only works if, as Rogers dextrously demonstrates, you can get the other person to unwittingly take some blame too.) What he's really propounding are winning PR ways. . . in an amiable, polished, generally winning manner.

Pub Date: Sept. 5th, 1984
Publisher: St. Martin's