FRIENDS AT COURT by Henry Cecil

FRIENDS AT COURT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The Brothers In Law (1956) have now been practising for twelve years and Roger Thursby is contemplating applying for silk. But before he achieves his approval as Her Majesty's counsel he becomes involved in many things. The two factors uppermost are the case of the police corrupters, the Glaciers, and the case of a lost heart -- for Roger's answers to Anne, whose father turns out to be the Chief Constable whose officers have been bribed. There's another case of drunken driving -- or was it?: an old lag whose repeat performance Roger refuses to take: the irritant of a bumptious young barrister: a horse race, which, while it doesn't go backwards, goes in every other direction: and of course the Glaciers' trial which ends in a sentence for Mr. Glacier. Roger takes it to the Court of Criminal appeal where judges, barristers and the prisoner (ventriloquizing) argue fussy points of terminology and law. This goes along with the earlier book very tidily in its picture of British legal points and pointers and leavens the whole with quite funny facetious flightiness. If that lawyer in your life has the first he will beg for this.

Publisher: Harper