MAN VS. THE WELFARE STATE by Henry Hazlitt

MAN VS. THE WELFARE STATE

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

From the tireless pen of an Old Economist, this attack on: deficit spending, antitrust laws, labor unions, the graduated income tax, public assistance, consumer protection, and all the other Welfare State measures which have brought the U.S. from pinnacle of prosperity (circa 1933) to its present disastrous pass. Asserting that only the operation of natural market mechanisms can yield economic security, Mr. Hazlitt urges a return to the days of the Gold Standard, the lightly taxed fortune, and unhampered business competition as the best cure for today's ""chronic inflation"" and ""gigantic growth of government power."" Hazlitt puts the conservative argument as clearly as anyone; the main problem with his analysis is its irrelevance. There's just no proof that the American public is about to repeal the New Deal in favor of a system which destroyed itself forty years ago. But if wishful thinking is your cup of herb tea, Hazlitt may set you to dreaming. Unless you've already tried his brew--eleven other books on these themes.

Pub Date: Dec. 12th, 1969
Publisher: Arlington House